Spirits of the Arcane

An exploration of Magic, the occult, hoodoo, and general Witchery

(Source: quidcogitas, via blaqmercury)

If a person spends more hours of the day critiquing the spiritual practices of others then they do focusing on their own…

Then they possess neither the right, nor the authority to sincerely critique anyone.

Those who are content in their work let it shine through their practice.

Those who are insecure in their work diminish others to feel validated in their practice.

nigrumincendium:

"Sulfur Totem" © Adam C. Eckley 2013

nigrumincendium:

"Sulfur Totem" © Adam C. Eckley 2013

(via platypush)

magictransistor:

Arnoldo di Villanova. Rosarium Philosophorium. 1550. 

An entry into the vessel of transformation, A conjunction of the two primal archetypal forces, Their merging into an hermaphrodite in a death or nigredo stage, The extraction or ascent of one facet of the soul into the Spiritual realm (see related here), The descent of a spiritual dew or essence from above, The return of the extracted soul forces, The final formation of the Stone pictured as the resurrection of the hermaphrodite (top to bottom). 

(via blaqmercury)


Mind and Body, Austin Osman Spare, 1953

Mind and Body, Austin Osman Spare, 1953

(Source: abystle, via dianaandpansson)

larkfall:

Bone spirit-calling trumpet, by Gemma Gary [source]

larkfall:

Bone spirit-calling trumpet, by Gemma Gary [source]

(via gayshitandwitchcraft)

spiritusarcanum:

How to make encharmed waters.
1. Write charm, word or sigil with watercolor pencil.
2. Place it into water while praying, chanting, spinning in circles and drooling, or whatever else does it for you.
3. Once the majority of pigment has run off into the water use it to dress objects, anoint people, sprinkle about a place, add to baths, floor washes, or to the laundry water; or (provided they’re non-toxic) infuse it with herbs to make a potion.


Re-blogging this because since my original post and it’s popularity I have been thinking that I left something out about this.This is actually a VERY ancient form of magic and it was an incredibly common form of spell to either write words or magical characters on some form of metal or ceramic plate with ink, wash it off with water or oil, and then consume the water or anoint the body with the oil. Spells of this sort can be found in The Book of Gold which is a handbook of Psalmic Magic recently translated by David Rankine.This type of magic can also be found in sources as ancient as the Greek Magical Papyri.Additionally, it wasn’t uncommon for folk healers of both the ancient world and Middle Ages to write charms and spells onto pieces of paper, form them into pills, and have their clients consume them to effect magical cures. In some cases if the healer knew the proper remedy for an illness but didn’t have the materials for it they would instead write out the prescription and have the patient eat it, believing the the words might act as a magical substitute for the medicine.

spiritusarcanum:

How to make encharmed waters.

1. Write charm, word or sigil with watercolor pencil.

2. Place it into water while praying, chanting, spinning in circles and drooling, or whatever else does it for you.

3. Once the majority of pigment has run off into the water use it to dress objects, anoint people, sprinkle about a place, add to baths, floor washes, or to the laundry water; or (provided they’re non-toxic) infuse it with herbs to make a potion.

Re-blogging this because since my original post and it’s popularity I have been thinking that I left something out about this.

This is actually a VERY ancient form of magic and it was an incredibly common form of spell to either write words or magical characters on some form of metal or ceramic plate with ink, wash it off with water or oil, and then consume the water or anoint the body with the oil.

Spells of this sort can be found in The Book of Gold which is a handbook of Psalmic Magic recently translated by David Rankine.

This type of magic can also be found in sources as ancient as the Greek Magical Papyri.

Additionally, it wasn’t uncommon for folk healers of both the ancient world and Middle Ages to write charms and spells onto pieces of paper, form them into pills, and have their clients consume them to effect magical cures. In some cases if the healer knew the proper remedy for an illness but didn’t have the materials for it they would instead write out the prescription and have the patient eat it, believing the the words might act as a magical substitute for the medicine.

(via aworldofelements)